At Belmount Hall, everything we serve is ‘FAIT MAISON’, except the bread from More Bakery in Staveley.

FROM THE BBC WEBSITE THIS MORNING:-

The summer rush to France – a magnet for more foreign tourists than any other country – is about to begin. And this year travellers may spot a new logo on menus, designed to flag up when food has been home-made. But how exactly is “home-made” defined?

The bad news is that – just like anywhere else in the developed world – many French restaurants just reheat pre-prepared food, rather than cooking it from scratch.

French consumers estimated, in a poll last October, that barely half of restaurant meals were home-made, while the Union of Hotel Skills and Industries suggests that 85% of restaurants secretly make use of frozen or vacuum-packed food.

In the country of Parmentier, Escoffier, and Paul Bocuse, to many people this just doesn’t seem right, so a law designed to uphold French culinary traditions was passed earlier this year, and came into force this week.

Now any restaurant that serves a home-made dish can indicate it on the menu with it new logo – in the shape of a saucepan with a roof-like lid. From next January it will be compulsory for all menus to carry the logo – so if you don’t see it, the food is not fait maison.

“We chose to represent ‘home-made’ with a logo so that foreign tourists could understand it,” says a government spokeswoman.

“French gastronomy represents 13.5% of foreign tourists’ expenses and it’s undeniable that if we add value to the quality of our restaurants, it will have an impact on tourism.”

Even professional chefs in smart restaurants have been cutting corners, it seems.

They can buy steak tartare that has been chopped irregularly to make it look as if it was just hand-prepared in the kitchen, and any number of faux home-made tarts and pies.

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